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Do you want to be part of the largest ever international effort to study an invasive plant?

Join the
Garlic Mustard Field Survey

It is widely believed that invasive species are larger, reproduce more and reach higher densities compared to their native ancestors. However, there are surprisingly few hard data to support this claim, even for some of the most well-known invaders. One of the most problematic invaders in North America is garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata), yet without good field data, important questions remain unanswered.

Garlic Mustard

Alliaria petiolata

Does garlic mustard really grow larger and reproduce better in North American populations than in native European populations? How much variation in performance is there among populations within Europe and North America? Answers to questions like these will ultimately lead to better understanding and management of invasive species

With your help, our goal is to form a broad network of scientists, students and environmentalists from across the globe to fill an important gap in data on native and introduced plant populations. This project is designed to be simple and achieved with just a few hours of work, once populations have been located.

 

Who can participate

This project is open to all. The map below show the possible extent of the garlic mustard in the northern hemisphere. The shaded areas of the map correspond to the density of the species. So black=high density, grey=low density.

Map

Introduced Range:

North America
USA (AK, AR, CO, CT, DC, DE, GA, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NY, OH, OK, OR, PA, SC, TN, UT, VA, VT, WA, WI, WV) 
CAN (BC, NB, NS, ON, QC)

Europe and the Middle East
Most of Europe and parts of North Africa and the Middle East surrounding the Mediterranean the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea

Asia
Near China’s borders with India, Pakistan and Afghanistan (China, Japan). Some populations in southern and eastern China, North Korea, South Korea and Japan.

Populations have also been identified in the southern hemisphere in Argentina, New Zealand and Australia. (....more information)

Wquipment needed
GPS unit, 2 meter sticks (or yard sticks), tape measure, 20 large paper envelopes (C5 or C4/Letter-sized ones will do), pencil (ink will smear if wet), digital camera.

 

Goals

.....More project information

 

This is a project of:

Global Invasions

Funded by

NSF