January 21, 2020
  • 5:59 am 7 Fish with Unusual Names
  • 2:42 am Meet the Lumpsucker
  • 11:54 pm 7 Species Ready for the Holiday SEAson
  • 10:06 pm 4 Fish that Live in the Arctic
  • 4:59 pm Going Deep for Gulf Restoration
7 Fish with Unusual Names

The ocean is full of weird animals, which have even weirder names. Here are 7 of the most unusual monikers the ocean has to offer! Frogfish © Richard Carey/Fotolia If you’re looking to find one of the strangest fish in the sea, look no further than the frogfish. Their leg-like fins, camouflaged skin and perpetual “oh […]

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Meet the Lumpsucker

What would you get if you combined a ping pong ball, a suction cup and a fish? A lumpsucker. Lumpsuckers are a group of small, spherical fish that live in the chilly waters of the Arctic, North Pacific and North Atlantic. They’re part of the Cyclopteridae family, which gets its name from the Greek words […]

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7 Species Ready for the Holiday SEAson

Candy canes and pinecones, joyful music and fireplace gatherings—signs that the holiday season is upon us! At some point in our lives, I’m sure that each and every one of us has wished that it was a holiday every day. Though we can’t give you an eternal festive season, we can provide you with some […]

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4 Fish that Live in the Arctic

When you think of Arctic animals, there are probably a few that come to mind. You likely picture distinctive critters like polar bears, puffins or narwhals—which is great! These animals deserve to be celebrated. But what about the less charismatic species? The Arctic is packed with weird and wonderful animals, many of whom are found […]

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Today is a day of celebration for the Gulf of Mexico. Nearly 10 years after the BP oil disaster, the federal government took its most significant step yet toward healing deep-sea habitats and marine wildlife harmed by the worst marine oil spill in history. With the release of the final Open Ocean Trustee restoration plan […]

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Capturing Litter and People’s Imagination on Toronto’s Waterfront

This blog was written by Chelsea Rochman, Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto, co-founder of the University of Toronto Trash Team and Scientific Advisor to Ocean Conservancy; and Susan Debreceni, the Outreach Manager and co-founder of the University of Toronto Trash Team.  It was a little more than two years ago when we independently discovered Baltimore’s […]

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Thanksgiving is always a time for reflection and gratitude, and this year is no exception. This Thanksgiving, we would like to express our appreciation and celebrate some ocean victories—many of which were possible because of the support of ocean advocates like you. I could not be prouder of our Ocean Conservancy team, our partners and […]

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Fish Tales from Alaska

Theresa Peterson is Alaska Marine Conservation Council’s (AMCC) longest serving staff person (14 years!), an active fisherwoman and long-time resident of Kodiak, home to the nation’s largest fishing fleet. Theresa has a diverse fishing portfolio: setnetting for salmon, fishing for tanner crab, longlining for halibut, and jigging for cod. Fishing is a family business for […]

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Why We (Still) Need Recycling

This past August I left the bustle of Washington, D.C., for Erie, Pennsylvania, where my husband took a teaching position at Penn State’s campus there. I was excited to experience life on the Great Lakes and, in some ways, to feel even more connected to Ocean Conservancy’s mission. After all, with its sandy shores, high […]

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Fishing for invertebrates is increasing dramatically, and it’s impacting marine ecosystems: How we can manage invertebrate fisheries better

Editor’s note: In 2016, roughly one-third of the total value of the world’s trade of fish and fish products was invertebrates. (They were approximately one-fifth of the global fish trade by live weight.) To learn more about the state and future of invertebrate fisheries management, The Skimmer interviewed Heike Lotze, a professor in the Department […]

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